Lao writing alphabet practice

History[ edit ] The Lao script was slowly standardized in the Mekong River valley after the various Tai principalities of the region were merged under Lan Xang in the 14th century. This script, sometimes known as Tai Noi, has changed little since its inception and continued use in the Lao-speaking regions of modern-day Laos and Isan. Conversely, the Thai alphabet continued to evolve, but the scripts still share similarities. Traditionally, only secular literature was written with the Lao alphabet.

Lao writing alphabet practice

Greek alphabet - Wikipedia

In the wider sense, an alphabet is a script that is segmental at the phoneme level—that is, it has separate glyphs for individual sounds and not for larger units such as syllables or words. In the narrower sense, some scholars distinguish "true" alphabets from two other types of segmental script, abjads and abugidas.

lao writing alphabet practice

These three differ from each other in the way they treat vowels: In alphabets in the narrow sense, on the other hand, consonants and vowels are written as independent letters.

Examples of present-day abjads are the Arabic and Hebrew scripts ; true alphabets include LatinCyrillic, and Korean hangul ; and abugidas are used to write TigrinyaAmharicHindiand Thai. The Canadian Aboriginal syllabics are also an abugida rather than a syllabary as their name would imply, since each glyph stands for a consonant that is modified by rotation to represent the following vowel.

In a true syllabary, each consonant-vowel combination would be represented by a separate glyph. All three types may be augmented with syllabic glyphs. These are the only time vowels are indicated.

The boundaries between the three types of segmental scripts are not always clear-cut. For example, Sorani Kurdish is written in the Arabic scriptwhich is normally an abjad. However, in Kurdish, writing the vowels is mandatory, and full letters are used, so the script is a true alphabet.

Other languages may use a Semitic abjad with mandatory vowel diacritics, effectively making them abugidas. On the other hand, the Phagspa script of the Mongol Empire was based closely on the Tibetan abugidabut all vowel marks were written after the preceding consonant rather than as diacritic marks.

Although short a was not written, as in the Indic abugidas, one could argue that the linear arrangement made this a true alphabet. Conversely, the vowel marks of the Tigrinya abugida and the Amharic abugida ironically, the original source of the term "abugida" have been so completely assimilated into their consonants that the modifications are no longer systematic and have to be learned as a syllabary rather than as a segmental script.

Even more extreme, the Pahlavi abjad eventually became logographic. Ge'ez Script of Ethiopia and Eritrea Thus the primary classification of alphabets reflects how they treat vowels.

For tonal languagesfurther classification can be based on their treatment of tone, though names do not yet exist to distinguish the various types.

Some alphabets disregard tone entirely, especially when it does not carry a heavy functional load, as in Somali and many other languages of Africa and the Americas. Such scripts are to tone what abjads are to vowels. Most commonly, tones are indicated with diacritics, the way vowels are treated in abugidas.

Lao alphabet (ອັກສອນລາວ)

This is the case for Vietnamese a true alphabet and Thai an abugida. In Thai, tone is determined primarily by the choice of consonant, with diacritics for disambiguation. In the Pollard scriptan abugida, vowels are indicated by diacritics, but the placement of the diacritic relative to the consonant is modified to indicate the tone.

More rarely, a script may have separate letters for tones, as is the case for Hmong and Zhuang. For most of these scripts, regardless of whether letters or diacritics are used, the most common tone is not marked, just as the most common vowel is not marked in Indic abugidas; in Zhuyin not only is one of the tones unmarked, but there is a diacritic to indicate lack of tone, like the virama of Indic.

The number of letters in an alphabet can be quite small.Free Online Language Courses. Word2Word is pleased to provide these links in the hope of all people developing a better understanding of others through the use of language.

Lao. Lao is a Tai-Kadai language spoken by approximately 15 million people in Laos and Thailand. It is closely related to Thai and speakers of Lao are able to understand spoken Thai without too many difficulties.

Thai speakers find it more difficult to understand Lao due to lack of exposure to the language. Practice your Lao by writing emails. In short, you have everything you need to practice and learn Lao via a language exchange.

Email, Text Chat or Voice Chat? The type of exchange that is right for you depends on your proficiency level in . Practice Writing the Alphabet. Learn about the letter E in this alphabet worksheet! Practice writing the letter E then draw and label two objects beginning with the letter E.

‎Writing Lao letters beginner on the App Store

More info Download Worksheet. Alphabet Practice: F. F is for football! Practice writing the letter F then draw and label two items beginning with F. Lao alphabet (ອັກສອນລາວ) After the unification of the Lao principalities (meuang) in the 14th century, the Lan Xang monarchs commissioned their scholars to create a new script to write the Lao language.

Notable features

Type of writing system: syllabic alphabet / abugida; Direction of writing: left to right in horizontal lines; Syllables. Free Handwriting Worksheets (alphabet handwriting worksheets, handwriting paper and cursive handwriting worksheets) for Preschool and Kindergarten.

These worksheets are for coloring, tracing, and writing uppercase and lowercase letters.

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